Media Alerts on Federal Courts of Appeals Cases

by Sarah Prosory 23. September 2011 16:44

Are you interested in popular, media-worthy, case information from the Federal Courts of Appeals? Check out this resource from the ABA:

http://www2.americanbar.org/SCFJI/Pages/MediaAlertsOnFederalCircuitCourts.aspx

Here's the 9th circuit: http://www2.americanbar.org/SCFJI/Pages/CaseSummaries9thCircuit.aspx

Basically the cases chosen are ones that are more for the public interest- they are expected to be talked about in the news. They are summarized by law professors and law students. It doesn't yet cover all circuits but the majority are there.

Easier Access to the Chronicle of Higher Education Online

by Sarah Prosory 30. June 2011 13:41

Hi all!

The Law Library is pleased to announce a new service for you as part of our subscription to The Chronicle of Higher Education online!

You can now go straight to the Chronicle's website when you're off campus and view premium content (with the gold key). All you have to do is create a free account with the Chronicle, using your @phoenixlaw.edu or @student.phoenixlaw.edu email address.

The Chronicle has really great articles all about higher education. My personal favorites have to do with technology in higher education. With the account you create, you can sign up for email newsletters (from their various blogs) to be delivered to your email inbox daily. I currently subscribe to the daily Wired Campus newsletter. I also enjoy reading the ProfHacker blog.

Alternatively, you can visit our databases page or our homepage database drop-down menu (below the catalog search box) to select the Chronicle of Higher Education. If you're off campus and go to the Chronicle's website through the law library's website, you'll be asked to enter your name and library barcode number, just like for our other databases.

We hope this new service is easier for you to access the Chronicle off campus! Feel free to email me with any questions you may have!

Enjoy your summer... Cool

New research tool on the Arizona Constitution

by Ted McClure 24. June 2011 09:51

The people of Arizona have made many changes to the State's Constitution since 1912. The Constitution can be amended by the Legislature confirmed in a voter referendum, or directly by voter initiative. Ever need to know (or just wonder) when a change was made and why?

Celebrating the centennial of the Arizona Constitutional Convention, the Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records has taken an idea developed by the State Capitol Museum and put on the web a "Timeline of the Arizona Constitution".

This searchable database can be browsed by year or searched by keyword, year, and type (referendum or initiative). It provides links to the the full text of historical election publicity pamphlets and to current provisions of the Arizona Constitution. It includes every amendment to the Arizona State Constitution since statehood. Useful for legal research, education, and historical exploration.

Tags:

Arizona | Research | Web

Lexis Pay-As-You-Go is No More!

by PSL Law Library 8. June 2011 16:40

For the solo practitioner that may not be able to afford the overhead of a LexisNexis database package, the credit card "pay-as-you-go" plan offered a panoply of paths to your legal preferences. Unfortunately, in the recent overhaul, Lexis decided to discontinue this feature.  When you go to the Lexis® Total Research System page and choose "sign in using a credit card" option, you are directed to the LexisNexis™ by Credit Card page that delivers a message that reads in part:

 

“LexisNexis no longer offers the website LexisNexis™ by Credit Card. This decision is part of our effort to create and support products that better meet those needs identified through collaboration with our customers. . .”

 

The message goes onto say that users could take advantage of lexisONE for free unenhanced state & federal case law and also directs users to LexisWeb®; which is their version of Google but with vetted sites.

 

This all comes as an unfortunate surprise.  On the bright side though, Westlaw® still offers a pay-as-you-go plan and hasn’t mentioned ending this option any time soon!

Tags:

Alumni | Practice | Tips | Web

Free Public Access to Court Opinions?

by Sarah Prosory 13. May 2011 13:36

An article today from the legal blog Justia called, On PACER and FDSys, points to a recent press release from the US Courts website that describes a pilot project of 12 courts that will provide free public access to court opinions through FDSys (the search engine for government documents). The article also has an excellent explanation of what you can search for on PACER, and discusses how PACER is not exactly free.

The pilot project does not include any courts in Arizona, but hey, at least they're trying!

Those who have taken my SRU workshop on FireFox Legal Add-ons will be especially interested in this development, and how it could effect RECAP!


Picture from MorgueFile

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