Congressional Information from the Insider's Point of View: Part 2

by Michelle Vallance 3. June 2013 11:45

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: Congressional bill tracking with GovTrack.us and the Sunlight Foundation. Part 1 featured the Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History.

Joshua Tauberer, creator of Govtrack.us, engaged the audience with his provocative presentation titled Overview of Congressional Information Policy and the Internet.  Mr. Tauberer is an advocate of open government and particularly of open government data. His website Govtrack.us, a legislative reference and bill tracking site, is actually built upon data provided by the U.S. government in similar Congressional websites like FDsys and THOMAS. Govtrack.us has many advanced search capabilities in addition to some unique features like an automatic redlining feature when comparing bill versions and the ability to create a statistical probability chart of a particular bill getting passed in Congress. His presentation materials can be found starting at page 9 of the conference materials.

Eric Mill, who works on tech policy and software at the Sunlight Foundation, led a compelling presentation titled Tracking Government Information Online. One of many of Mr. Mill’s impressive software creations is the search engine and alert system for government information called Scout. Mr. Mill is in the same “camp” of open government advocates as Joshua Tauberer (above) and the two have collaborated on numerous projects. Other search engines created/recommended by Mr. Mill to try: federalregister.gov, govpulse.us and data.gov. Mr. Mill’s materials can be found starting on page 128 of the conference materials.

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

Lance and the Law

by Alison Ewing 22. January 2013 15:40

 

Lance Armstrong’s wealth is estimated to be $100 million but after his confession in Oprah’s interview that will probably need to be recalculated. Read more about the real and potential lawsuits involving Armstrong in this NPR article.

Interested in learning more about Lance Armstrong’s legal woes and his career?  Take a look at ProQuest eLibrary for news articles, transcripts, and pictures. Don’t forget that WestlawNext and Lexis  also have legal and general news files.  Or, for assistance finding other authoritative news sources stop by the Legal Research Help Desk.

 

Image Source (morguefile.com)

Happy Constitution Day!

by Sarah Prosory 17. September 2012 14:48

We the people, in order to form a more perfect union...

On this day, September 17th, in 1787 (225 years ago!) the United States Constitution was finalized and signed. Here are some great websites to browse for more info:

Any other websites you found useful for celebrating Constitution Day? Share with us in the comments below!

Lawyers, Marketing, Olympics, AWR?

by Sarah Prosory 31. July 2012 15:47

Reading my RSS feeds, I came across an interesting topic, which is timely: lawyers and marketing at the Olympics. This one blog post, led me on a quick adventure (seriously like 5 minutes), and I ended up pondering- could someone use this topic for their AWR paper? Anyone? Bueller? Here's what happened:

First I saw this blog post and thought what an interesting job for a lawyer: Olympic Lawyers Shadow Torch's Every Move to Prevent 'Ambush Marketing' (Legal Blog Watch).

Later I saw another blog post on a related note, marketing at the Olympics... and breaking the rules? See, Headphone Maker Beats Marketing Rules at Olympics (CNET.com) followed by a friendly reminder: U.K. Olympic Athletes Banned From Wearing Beats (CNET.com).

Curious about this topic, I Googled "lawyers marketing olympics" and found a law journal article from 1996! See, 3 Vill. Sports & Ent. L.J. 423 (1996) Ambushing the Olympic Games; Davis, Robert N., This article is in the HeinOnline database, and from there I wondered if anyone has written on the subject of ambush marketing since 1996... so I used their ScholarCheck feature. This showed me that there were several articles written since then (2003, 2005), but perhaps an update to these articles is in order?

Image from HeinOnline

In summary, I used an RSS feed of legal blogs to give me current news, which sparked an interest in a topic, which got me to use the HeinOnline database to search law journal articles, which showed me that this topic is in need of another updated article! A great process to find a topic and begin your research for your AWR paper.

What are you writing for your AWR? Do you need help with your research? Check out our AWR Liaison Librarian Program! Or just visit us at the Legal Research Help Desk in the Law Library on the 14th floor! Email us or call us at (602) 682-6898!

Quick Reference Guide to PIPA, SOPA, and the OPEN Act

by Alison Ewing 18. January 2012 17:03

From the American Library Association (ALA)...

"Three copyright-related bills are currently in play at the start of 2012 – all of which take aim at any website beyond U.S. borders that distribute counterfeit or copyright infringing products. All three bills operate under the assumption that there is a problem that needs to be solved – and the best, or only, way to combat online infringement overseas is with more law targeted at foreign websites. These bills have the potential to negatively impact fundamental library principles. The following chart [link] is for quick reference (not meant to be comprehensive), and outlines the primary issues and concerns of interest to the library community and those who use the Internet."

~Corey Williams, American Library Association.

 

Hat tip to the Law Librarian Blog, and beSpacific

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