Question from the Grammar Policeman

by Ted McClure 6. January 2011 13:23

Which one of these is wrong (or at least different in meaning from the other three), and why?

(a) After Ramsauer took office as Transport Minister, he proscribed Denglish.

(b) After he took office as Transport Minister, Ramsauer proscribed Denglish.

(c) He proscribed Denglish after Ramsauer took office as Transport Minister.

(d) Ramsauer proscribed Denglish after he took office as Transport Minister.

For details, see http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=2891.

WestlawNext Available to All in January 2011

by Sarah Prosory 17. December 2010 09:57

When you return to Phoenix Law in 2011, ready to start the new year fresh, don't be caught off guard by the change from Westlaw to WestlawNext! You will still have access to "classic" Westlaw, but now the option to use WestlawNext will be available. Also, some searches in Westlaw will send you to WestlawNext. We want you to be prepared! So here's the scoop!

How to access WestlawNext:

Log-in to Westlaw as you normally would, but then choose WestlawNext at the very top of the screen:

 

Also, if you conduct your searches using the Legal Research Center (in the middle of the page after you login), your results will automatically be retrieved using WestlawNext:

 

PLEASE NOTE: Currently you cannot print to the Westlaw printer using WestlawNext!

Choose another printer in the meantime. 

View this PDF for tips on how to get around the printing issue.

What does WestlawNext look like?

 

With a single search box, you don't have to select a database to begin a search. No need to truncate words or use connectors either, but you can if you like. The single search box doesn't mind. Just type in what you're looking for and select a jurisdiction. 

The results will be returned by relevancy and sorted into categories for ease of use.

Wait! I like to limit and use terms & connectors!

The single search box allows you to enter terms & connectors if you'd like, and you still have the option of limiting your search ahead of time:

Also, the Advanced Search feature...

...will help you build a Boolean Terms & Connectors query:

So... test it out! Get familiar with the interface so you can be an efficient researcher!

Need help?

  • Don't hesitate to ask a librarian for assistance with the new interface! Email us or call us at 602.682.6898. Visit the reference desk in the law library during the hours librarians are available for reference.
  • There are trainings and user guides online that are extremely helpful. Once you've signed into Westlaw under the Home tab choose either "User Guides" or "Training" and follow the prompts to WestlawNext.

Enjoy your holidays, and look forward to the changes in January! Smile

(All images used belong to Thomson Reuters)

Holiday Gifts from the Federal Government

by Rob 13. December 2010 15:36

The Federal Government has gift ideas for the holidays on USA.gov that come from all branches of government. For example the US Supreme Court has ornaments and snow globes, the White House offers Presidential ornaments, and the US Treasury tops them all with 24-karat gold ornaments for the tree. Happy shopping.

Gifts and souvenirs from the U.S. government.

Tags:

Legal Trivia | Tips

Blogs Every Law Student Should Monitor

by Ted McClure 23. November 2010 13:09

If you are not monitoring the following blawgs, you are falling behind:

LAW.COM (start at http://www.law.com/jsp/law/rss.jsp)

JURIST - Paper Chase (http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/paperchase/)

SCOTUSBLOG (start at http://www.scotusblog.com/2010/11/scotusblog-4-0-and-the-rss-feeds-feature/)

Except for Paper Chase (which is not terribly burdensome), each of these blawgs permits you to narrow your subscription to the news you need. There may be other sources you need to follow based on the courses you are taking and any research you are involved in (see http://www.blawg.com/ or http://www.abajournal.com/blawgs/by_topic/), but every student needs to follow these three.

Ted McClure, Faculty Services Law Librarian

Finals--Choose to Manage Your Stress

by Library 15. November 2010 13:47

In just a few weeks, law students will be starting their final exams. As finals approach, stress levels tend to rise. I decided to do some searching in Westlaw for articles that may provide tips for stress management. My terms & connectors search (stress /3 relief & "law students" & exam!) retrieved 28 articles in the Journals & Law Reviews (JLR) directory.

One interesting, short article written by a law student at Washburn listed the following techniques to help with stress management: positive thinking, exercise, focusing on the long-term goal, laughter, camaraderie, and even avoiding negative people and the negative consequences of harmful stress management. Pamela Taylor, Stress Relief, J. Kan. B. Ass'n, Oct. 2009, at 14.

The author suggests releasing worry by first explaining the worry and then brainstorming for solutions. For this author, utilizing this technique helped her raise her grades one grade in almost all of her classes during her second semester in law school. Perhaps this one page article would be worth reading!


 

Tags:

Research | Tips

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