No Cameras in Courtroom, Journalists Tweet Instead

by Sarah Prosory 15. October 2010 11:17

Picture source: The New York Times, Copyright 2010 The New York Times Company

Social media is affecting many areas of our lives, as well as changing the definition of media in courtrooms. Journalism is being altered, and no longer is there a delay in providing information to readers and TV viewers.

An article from the New York Times today, discusses how Twitter was used in a recent trial in Connecticut. A journalist interviewed at the trial explained how "with the unlimited capacity of the Internet, she could paint a word picture of every aspect of the trial" through sharing tweets on Twitter. According to this journalist, "it was just a matter of how fast [she] could type." This creates an issue with the immediate decisions these journalists have to make about what to tweet and what is inappropriate. There is no editor there to filter their tweets, which could include disturbing testimony of violence and sexual assault. Besides this issue, there is concern with the "play-by-play" openness of the tweeting and how it shifts the view from "a horrific trial to entertainment."

Below are more articles that discuss the issue of social media in the courtroom, not only pertaining to journalists tweeting but jurors and lawyers using social media as well:

Also, read up on the Rules of the Supreme Court of Arizona that describe Electronic and Photographic Coverage of Public Judicial Proceedings.

Should tweeting be banned in the courtroom? Give us your thoughts in the comments below! 

Supreme Court to Provide Audio Recordings

by Sarah Prosory 28. September 2010 16:18

Picture source: MorgueFile

This just in... the Supreme Court announced today that they will soon be providing audio recordings of all oral arguments freely on their website. You will be able to download the recordings or simply listen through the court's website. This will begin with the October Term 2010, with audio recordings being available at the end of each argument week. The first arguments are heard on the first Monday in October, which for this year will be October 4th.

Read more here about how oral arguments are heard in the Supreme Court. View the Court's calendar of days they will hear arguments. Also, a Yahoo article explains about broadcasters requesting same-day release recordings in the past, which may provide some reasoning as to why the Supreme Court will be providing the recordings now.

If you're curious, you can currently hear audio recordings from the Supreme Court provided by the website Oyez.org. They have been providing audio from the Supreme Court since around 1993.

Future of the Book

by Sarah Prosory 22. September 2010 13:33

Could this be the future of the book? An interactive enviroment with touch screen computers? Would these be helpful with studying or writing scholarly articles? Would these be helpful with sharing ideas and networking? What are the copyright/intellectual property implications? Oh the pondering... Happy Wednesday!

The Future of the Book. from IDEO on Vimeo.

Educational Technology: Machines for Learning

by Rob 21. September 2010 10:40

Look at this just to see an original Horn-book from the 1600s!

The New York Times provides a slide show of 'learning machines' for the classroom from the horn-book to mobile digital devices.

More

Phoenix Law Library QR Code

by Rob 17. September 2010 13:24

qrcode This is readable by any smart phone with a QR app.

I also like it as art. QR codes require a reader download to your smart phone, for example Kaywa.

Library use for research would include directing a patron with a smartphone to an informational website or related database from a QR code in the stacks. 

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