Juror Searches Wikipedia

by Sarah Prosory 17. December 2010 08:49

This morning I saw this Slashdot.org article about a mistrial declared in Florida because a juror searched Wikipedia for a term that was unknown to her. She was "just looking up a phrase". Despite numerous warnings from the judge to jurors to not research the case, the juror brought what she found on Wikipedia to the jury room.

This is nothing new. Back in January of 2010, a murder case was thrown out because a juror looked up a definition on Wikipedia as well. The Washington Post wrote a very good article about how technology has caused more trouble for jurors who need to refrain from using it while serving on a jury.

My pondering is... will jury rules need to change to adjust to our technology-filled world? Should lawyers provide definitions/more information to confused jurors, so that jurors don't need to feel that they should look things up themselves? All it takes is a Google search on a smartphone and they have their confusion resolved. Give your comments below!

HeinOnline- New Look & Bar Journals Library

by Sarah Prosory 6. December 2010 15:41

We are pleased to announce a new look to HeinOnline, as well as our subscription addition of the Bar Journals library! (Please note, you must be on campus to view these links automatically. If you're elsewhere, you will be prompted for your name and library barcode to access the databases).

HeinOnline's main page that lists all the "libraries" that the Law Library subscribes to has gone through a face-lift. Not only does it have a cleaner look, but they've added a few new links on behalf of the Phoenix Law Library. Here are some changes:

The Publication Title search box has moved to the upper right side of the screen.

There are now links to the Phoenix School of Law Library's website, catalog, and databases page.

 

 

And the best part... we've just subscribed to the Bar Journals library. This library includes over 70 state and local bar journals and newsletters.

 

Take a break, and check out the new look and new library on HeinOnline!

ODR: technology meets Alternative Dispute Resolution

by Rob 1. December 2010 11:51

Online dispute resolution (ODR) is a growing area of ADR. ODR exclusively uses websites with and without human facilitators instead of face-to-face discussion. The clients may use "automatic negotiation" or "cyber-mediation" among other services. The ODR sites are free and fee-based. The most common use of ODR is to resolve e-commerce disputes. The National Center for Technology and Dispute Resolution offers more information on ODR.

One example of note is iCourthouse, an ODR site that allows anyone to select pending cases and participate online as a juror.  

Blogs Every Law Student Should Monitor

by Ted McClure 23. November 2010 13:09

If you are not monitoring the following blawgs, you are falling behind:

LAW.COM (start at http://www.law.com/jsp/law/rss.jsp)

JURIST - Paper Chase (http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/paperchase/)

SCOTUSBLOG (start at http://www.scotusblog.com/2010/11/scotusblog-4-0-and-the-rss-feeds-feature/)

Except for Paper Chase (which is not terribly burdensome), each of these blawgs permits you to narrow your subscription to the news you need. There may be other sources you need to follow based on the courses you are taking and any research you are involved in (see http://www.blawg.com/ or http://www.abajournal.com/blawgs/by_topic/), but every student needs to follow these three.

Ted McClure, Faculty Services Law Librarian

Phoenix Law Review Now Available Online!

by Sarah Prosory 22. November 2010 09:44

Picture source: PSL Docket 11-19-10

Happy Monday everyone!

Did you know you can access the Phoenix Law Review online? Head over to the Phoenix Law homepage, select Academics, and then select Law Review. Or for direct access click here. Read volumes 1 and 2, and volume 3 which is issued in two parts: Arizona Government and Legal Education. This is a valuable resource, as HeinOnline only has volume 1 of the Phoenix Law Review and Westlaw and LexisNexis do not have the publication at all.

Also, the Phoenix Law Review is having a Spring 2011 Write-On Competition. This competition is open to all students who have completed at least 25 credit hours by the end of summer classes, have at least two semesters of law school left, have completed Lawyering Process 1 & 2, and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.50. If you are interested in entering the competition, add the Phoenix Law Review Spring 2011 Write-On Competition TWEN page (must have access to Westlaw and be a PSL student to do so). Details for how to enter will be on the TWEN page at 1:00 PM on December 11, 2010.

Enjoy the short week & read the Phoenix Law Review during the long weekend!

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