Lance and the Law

by Alison Ewing 22. January 2013 15:40

 

Lance Armstrong’s wealth is estimated to be $100 million but after his confession in Oprah’s interview that will probably need to be recalculated. Read more about the real and potential lawsuits involving Armstrong in this NPR article.

Interested in learning more about Lance Armstrong’s legal woes and his career?  Take a look at ProQuest eLibrary for news articles, transcripts, and pictures. Don’t forget that WestlawNext and Lexis  also have legal and general news files.  Or, for assistance finding other authoritative news sources stop by the Legal Research Help Desk.

 

Image Source (morguefile.com)

Cats and the Commerce Clause

by PSL Law Library 11. December 2012 14:44

Cats substantially impact interstate commerce according to a recent 13 page opinion by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling discussed by the ABA Journal. The court ruled that the cats living at author Ernest Hemingway's museum/home are subject to federal regulation.  In Constitutional Law, law students learn that the Commerce Clause regulates instruments, channels, and things (including cats?) that substantially impact commerce.  The cats are the offspring of the author's famous six-toed cat, Snowball.  Judge Dubina, writing for the majority, reasoned that the presence of the cats draws people to the museum as an exhibition.  Thus, they are an important part of the museum's commercial activity and therefore subject to regulation by Congress.

If you are interested in learning more about constitutional law, take a look in the library catalog.  Or, stop by the Legal Research Help Desk for assistance with formulating a research strategy. 

Meow!

-Kristin

Lawyers, Marketing, Olympics, AWR?

by Sarah Prosory 31. July 2012 15:47

Reading my RSS feeds, I came across an interesting topic, which is timely: lawyers and marketing at the Olympics. This one blog post, led me on a quick adventure (seriously like 5 minutes), and I ended up pondering- could someone use this topic for their AWR paper? Anyone? Bueller? Here's what happened:

First I saw this blog post and thought what an interesting job for a lawyer: Olympic Lawyers Shadow Torch's Every Move to Prevent 'Ambush Marketing' (Legal Blog Watch).

Later I saw another blog post on a related note, marketing at the Olympics... and breaking the rules? See, Headphone Maker Beats Marketing Rules at Olympics (CNET.com) followed by a friendly reminder: U.K. Olympic Athletes Banned From Wearing Beats (CNET.com).

Curious about this topic, I Googled "lawyers marketing olympics" and found a law journal article from 1996! See, 3 Vill. Sports & Ent. L.J. 423 (1996) Ambushing the Olympic Games; Davis, Robert N., This article is in the HeinOnline database, and from there I wondered if anyone has written on the subject of ambush marketing since 1996... so I used their ScholarCheck feature. This showed me that there were several articles written since then (2003, 2005), but perhaps an update to these articles is in order?

Image from HeinOnline

In summary, I used an RSS feed of legal blogs to give me current news, which sparked an interest in a topic, which got me to use the HeinOnline database to search law journal articles, which showed me that this topic is in need of another updated article! A great process to find a topic and begin your research for your AWR paper.

What are you writing for your AWR? Do you need help with your research? Check out our AWR Liaison Librarian Program! Or just visit us at the Legal Research Help Desk in the Law Library on the 14th floor! Email us or call us at (602) 682-6898!

Quick Reference Guide to PIPA, SOPA, and the OPEN Act

by Alison Ewing 18. January 2012 17:03

From the American Library Association (ALA)...

"Three copyright-related bills are currently in play at the start of 2012 – all of which take aim at any website beyond U.S. borders that distribute counterfeit or copyright infringing products. All three bills operate under the assumption that there is a problem that needs to be solved – and the best, or only, way to combat online infringement overseas is with more law targeted at foreign websites. These bills have the potential to negatively impact fundamental library principles. The following chart [link] is for quick reference (not meant to be comprehensive), and outlines the primary issues and concerns of interest to the library community and those who use the Internet."

~Corey Williams, American Library Association.

 

Hat tip to the Law Librarian Blog, and beSpacific

Flashing Headlights

by PSL Law Library 15. September 2011 11:20

 

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/571907

Have you ever flashed your headlights to warn other drivers about a speed trap?  Is it legal to flash your headlights?  If it is illegal does this law violate your constitutional right to freedom of speech? One man in Florida believes that the ticket he received for flashing his headlights is a violation of his right to free speech.  Read all about the suit he has filed here.

If you are interested in viewing your first amendment rights take the following steps.

1)      Log onto LexisNexis

2)      Make sure the Legal tab is selected

3)      Select view more next to Federal Legal – U.S.

4)      Select USCS – United States Code Service: Code, Const, Rules, Conventions & Public Laws

5)      You can now expand the sections in the Table of Contents, start with:

a.       Constitution of the United States of America

b.      Amendments

c.       Amendment 1

d.      Religious and political freedom (part 1 of 4)

e.      Start reading

You can also read the first amendment by looking at a book or locating it on Westlaw.

 

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