Lexis (R) Advanced for Solo Practitioners

by PSL Law Library 27. October 2010 20:23

 

Picture Source:

Stock.xchng

This really is as amazing as it sounds. . .LexisNexis one of the leading legal databases in the US has just launched Lexis(R) Advanced for Solo Practioners.  The new Reasearch Tool was built for a solo or two person firm & Lexis(R) is offering this new service at an unbelievable price!  Lexis(R) Advance is being released on their new platform for the awe inducing price of $175 as a flat rate fee per month for a solo practioner.  You can also add an additional lawyer for the the discounted rate of an extra $140 per month.  If you would like to get a peek at Lexis(R) Advance for Solos and view a live demo please click LAS.


Here's what you'll get access to for your $175 per month: all federal and state case law, including headnotes and case summaries; statutes and constitutions from all state and federal jurisdictions; Shepard’s Citations; and LexisNexis jury verdicts, briefs, pleadings and motions.  For a complete breakdown please click here for the Content Summary in PDF provided by Lexis(R).

 

 

Food for Thought

by PSL Law Library 22. October 2010 14:33

Picture source

While surfing the internet I came across an interesting article regarding a possible city ordinance in San Francisco, CA.  If approved this ordinance would place a ban on fast food restaurants, such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s and Burger King, from placing toys in their children’s meals until the meals become healthier.  Click here to read the article.  As you can imagine this issue has sparked a lot of discussion and it’s easy to name a few pros and cons.  Pro, maybe it will help teach kids about proper nutrition.  Con, as a parent you are no longer making the decision on what your child can eat. 

Reading this article about a city ordinance inspired me to get a little more information using both Lexis and Westlaw.  At the top of the research screen in Lexis you will find the legal dictionary search box; this is where I entered my search term (city ordinance).  When using Westlaw I entered my search term in the definitions box on the left side of the screen.  One database came back with no results, forcing me to change my search term.  The other database didn’t have a result for my exact search term but did have 21 results.  One of which was exactly what I needed.  Another thing I noticed was that one of the definitions was a bit more in-depth than the other.  This simple search demonstrated just one of the differences between the “big two” and why both should be used.  I suggest trying the search yourself and making your own decision on which database is better.

As for a decision on the city ordinance, a vote was supposed to take place on October 19th but has been postponed until November 2nd, Election Day. 

No Cameras in Courtroom, Journalists Tweet Instead

by Sarah Prosory 15. October 2010 11:17

Picture source: The New York Times, Copyright 2010 The New York Times Company

Social media is affecting many areas of our lives, as well as changing the definition of media in courtrooms. Journalism is being altered, and no longer is there a delay in providing information to readers and TV viewers.

An article from the New York Times today, discusses how Twitter was used in a recent trial in Connecticut. A journalist interviewed at the trial explained how "with the unlimited capacity of the Internet, she could paint a word picture of every aspect of the trial" through sharing tweets on Twitter. According to this journalist, "it was just a matter of how fast [she] could type." This creates an issue with the immediate decisions these journalists have to make about what to tweet and what is inappropriate. There is no editor there to filter their tweets, which could include disturbing testimony of violence and sexual assault. Besides this issue, there is concern with the "play-by-play" openness of the tweeting and how it shifts the view from "a horrific trial to entertainment."

Below are more articles that discuss the issue of social media in the courtroom, not only pertaining to journalists tweeting but jurors and lawyers using social media as well:

Also, read up on the Rules of the Supreme Court of Arizona that describe Electronic and Photographic Coverage of Public Judicial Proceedings.

Should tweeting be banned in the courtroom? Give us your thoughts in the comments below! 

What's New in the Library?

by Library 12. October 2010 08:09

Want to know when the library receives a new book or resource about __________ (you fill in the blank!)?  If so, you can set up a preferred search in the catalog.

If you have a favorite author or topic for which you often search when using the catalog, you can save the search with the click of a button. This will prevent you from having to key in the search each time.

How to set up a Preferred Search:

1. Go to the Law Library Catalog.
2. Log in to My Library Record.
3. Search for an author, subject, title, or keyword. 
4. When your results are displayed, click the button marked "Save as preferred search".
5. The next time that you log in to your library record, you can click the "Preferred Searches" button to see a list of your saved searches.
6. Click on the search link associated with any of the preferred search terms in the list to quickly execute your search.
7. You will retrieve a list of new materials added to the library collection which match your search.
8. Check the "Mark for Email" box.

You will receive notifications each Monday if there are new items that match your search criteria. The email will be from: Infilaw System Library Catalog Notification of New Arrival.

 

Current Events in Your Practice Area

by Kristin Moye Pruszynski 30. September 2010 16:30

Source: Morguefile.com

Want a quick update so that you can keep up with the latest news in your practice area?  Try the Law Professor Blog network to find blurbs about recent cases, legislation, and publications! This page has links to other Law Professor blogs that are updated frequently by legal scholars to keep you informed about a host of topics in a number of practice areas.  Click here for the landing page where you will find links to numerous law professor blogs indexed by practice area.

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