Congressional Information from the “Insiders” Point of View: Part 1

by Alison Ewing 15. May 2013 14:38

  

 

 

 

 

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that   featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: The Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History. Part 2 will feature GovTrack.us and Congressional bill tracking.

Ellen Sweet, Legislative Reference Specialist at the Tax Division, U.S. Department of Justice, led the audience through the legislative process using a federal Indian law (NAGPRA) that included detailed information about the documents produced from the process and which of those documents are the most likely to yield legislative intent information. Excellent flowcharts illustrated the process. Her materials can be found starting at page 37 of the conference materials.

The excellent, up-to-date Finding or Compiling Federal Legislative Histories Electronically was presented by Rick McKinney, the Assistant Law Librarian at the Federal Reserve Board Library. Mr. McKinney’s expertise is the electronic availability of legislative documents and the chart that he included in his materials is a timesaver for anyone who does legislative intent research.

Ms. Sweet and Mr. McKinney are co- authors of the indispensable Law Librarians’ Society of D.C. Legislative Sourcebook 

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

 

 

 

Bluebooking for AWR

by Alison Ewing 24. April 2013 16:17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Need to do a little fine tuning of the citations in your AWR paper? Need a review of footnoting? Then the Library’s workshop on Bluebooking for AWRs is for you!

Please join us on Tuesday April 30th at noon in Room 1337 for this 50 minute workshop.

This is the last Library workshop for this semester,but in the future, take a look at our library workshops page to view a list of workshop descriptions and a link to the workshop calendar

Don’t forget the Library now offers legal research instruction tailored for your study group! Any group of 5 or more can order a custom session.To request a session, complete this form. 

Who Own$ the Law : Private Ownership of Public Law

by Alison Ewing 10. April 2013 16:27

 

The video of Fastcase CEO Ed Walters' presentation at last month's ReInvent Law Silicon Valley 2013 Conference is now available for viewing on the ReInvent Law Channel (hat tip to the Law Librarian Blog). Here's the direct link to Walters' Who Owns The Law: Private Ownership of Public Law, and How to Stop It.

Going to practice in Arizona? You might want to know who owns the law in Arizona, a topic that is included in the Library’s workshop “Arizona Practice Research” being offered next Wednesday, 4/17, from noon-1:00 in Room 1337

Image from Moguefile.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Re Polar Bear

by Alison Ewing 4. April 2013 09:00

The D.C. Circuit recently affirmed the decision to list polar bears as an endangered species. According to the court, “a number of industry groups, environmental organizations, and states challenged the Listing Rule as either overly restrictive or insufficiently protective of the polar bear.” This might be an excellent issue for an AWR! 

 In addition to the legal materials that you can find on Westlaw and Lexis, you should also explore the scholarly, non-legal resources in ProQuest Research Library on endangered species, climate change and the effects of the loss of polar bears on Native Peoples. ProQuest Research Library can be found in the drop-down menu on the Library’s website under Library Databases. If you need help searching ProQuest, you can always drop by the Legal Research Help Desk, Ask a Librarian  or if you are a self-learner, check out this research guide about how to use ProQuest Research Library.

Another Proquest Database, Proquest Congressional has this research guide on endangered species.  

Image from Morguefile.com

 

 

Research from a Congressional Point of View

by Alison Ewing 13. March 2013 16:11

 Researching  a topic and want to know what congress has had to say about it? One of the best resources for congressional research is ProQuest Congressional .  Why would you use ProQuest Congressional instead of Westlaw and Lexis? Here are some examples.

Let’s say you are writing your paper on the Indian Court of Offenses and want to cite to the 1926 primary source hearings on that subject…it’s on ProQuest Congressional but not on WL or Lexis.  In fact, ProQuest Congressional has documents that go back to 1789! Maybe you are researching the recent Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 but want some historical perspective on the topic. ProQuest Congressional has hearings and congressional reports that pre-date the passage of the original Violence Against Women Act of 1990.  ProQuest also includes document types not found on WL or Lexis, like maps!  

ProQuest Congressional can be found in the drop-down menu on the Library’s website under Library Databases. 

It’s easy to see what you are searching when you go to the Advanced Search screen:

Questions? Ask a Librarian!

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