Arizona Legal Research Guide

by Lidia Koelbel 20. June 2013 10:09

The Library would like to announce the publication of the Arizona Legal Research Guide.  This newest guide is a compilation of numerous helpful resources for different types of research on Arizona's laws, cases, regulations, and practice.  The guide includes free resources proven to be very useful in real practice when costly subscription databases are no longer readily available. 

There is also historical information and links to other compilations of resources expanding the materials available to you.  Take a look for yourself.  You can access the guide here:  http://researchguides.phoenixlaw.edu/ArizonaLegalResearch

Alison Ewing's expertise in Arizona legal research was crucial to the composition of this guide.

Introducing the Library Bar Access Program Membership

by Lidia Koelbel 22. August 2012 14:00

No Cameras in Courtroom, Journalists Tweet Instead

by Sarah Prosory 15. October 2010 11:17

Picture source: The New York Times, Copyright 2010 The New York Times Company

Social media is affecting many areas of our lives, as well as changing the definition of media in courtrooms. Journalism is being altered, and no longer is there a delay in providing information to readers and TV viewers.

An article from the New York Times today, discusses how Twitter was used in a recent trial in Connecticut. A journalist interviewed at the trial explained how "with the unlimited capacity of the Internet, she could paint a word picture of every aspect of the trial" through sharing tweets on Twitter. According to this journalist, "it was just a matter of how fast [she] could type." This creates an issue with the immediate decisions these journalists have to make about what to tweet and what is inappropriate. There is no editor there to filter their tweets, which could include disturbing testimony of violence and sexual assault. Besides this issue, there is concern with the "play-by-play" openness of the tweeting and how it shifts the view from "a horrific trial to entertainment."

Below are more articles that discuss the issue of social media in the courtroom, not only pertaining to journalists tweeting but jurors and lawyers using social media as well:

Also, read up on the Rules of the Supreme Court of Arizona that describe Electronic and Photographic Coverage of Public Judicial Proceedings.

Should tweeting be banned in the courtroom? Give us your thoughts in the comments below! 

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