Call Numbers: The Basics

by PSL Law Library 12. September 2013 14:33

 

Call numbers are derived from a classification system used by libraries to organize materials into classes (subjects) so like materials are shelved together.  Our Library uses the Library of Congress Classification System which is often used by academic libraries in the United States and other countries.  You may be more familiar with the Dewey Decimal Classification System, most often used by public libraries.  You can find call numbers on the spine or cover (lower left corner) of the material.  Call numbers also appear in the results list and item records in the catalog.  If an item in the catalog doesn’t have a call number then it’s an online resource.

The call number can be narrowed into very specific subjects:
a. K is for Law
b. KF is for Law in the United States
c. KF801 is for Contract Law in the United States
d. KF801.A7 is for Casebooks on Contract Law in the United States
e. KF801.Z9 is for Study Aids on Contract Law in the United States 

Now that you know what a call number is you can use this information to locate materials in any academic library.  Find study aids on Contracts in any collection (or library) by looking for items with the call number KF801.Z9.  Many call numbers contain the publishing date to help ensure you select the latest edition.  Glannon Guide to Contracts, KF801.Z9 S49 2013 was published in 2013.  Finally, find a greater number of materials on a subject by looking for materials with similar call numbers.

*For more information on call numbers please refer to the library maps located at the Research Desk.

Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin: Comprehensive Research Guide

by Michelle Vallance 5. July 2013 16:46

If you were following the recent affirmative action case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, then you might be interested in a research guide compiled by the UT Law Library. http://tarltonguides.law.utexas.edu/fisher-ut

The guide provides full-text access to all of the pleadings in the case, from its original filing in the W.D. of Texas. In addition, you can find links to significant scholarly articles on affirmative action, as well as a news archive detailing the history of the Fisher case.

This is a terrific resource, especially if you are interested in writing your AWR on affirmative action!

Arizona Legal Research Guide

by Lidia Koelbel 20. June 2013 10:09

The Library would like to announce the publication of the Arizona Legal Research Guide.  This newest guide is a compilation of numerous helpful resources for different types of research on Arizona's laws, cases, regulations, and practice.  The guide includes free resources proven to be very useful in real practice when costly subscription databases are no longer readily available. 

There is also historical information and links to other compilations of resources expanding the materials available to you.  Take a look for yourself.  You can access the guide here:  http://researchguides.phoenixlaw.edu/ArizonaLegalResearch

Alison Ewing's expertise in Arizona legal research was crucial to the composition of this guide.

Congressional Information from the Insider's Point of View: Part 2

by Michelle Vallance 3. June 2013 11:45

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: Congressional bill tracking with GovTrack.us and the Sunlight Foundation. Part 1 featured the Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History.

Joshua Tauberer, creator of Govtrack.us, engaged the audience with his provocative presentation titled Overview of Congressional Information Policy and the Internet.  Mr. Tauberer is an advocate of open government and particularly of open government data. His website Govtrack.us, a legislative reference and bill tracking site, is actually built upon data provided by the U.S. government in similar Congressional websites like FDsys and THOMAS. Govtrack.us has many advanced search capabilities in addition to some unique features like an automatic redlining feature when comparing bill versions and the ability to create a statistical probability chart of a particular bill getting passed in Congress. His presentation materials can be found starting at page 9 of the conference materials.

Eric Mill, who works on tech policy and software at the Sunlight Foundation, led a compelling presentation titled Tracking Government Information Online. One of many of Mr. Mill’s impressive software creations is the search engine and alert system for government information called Scout. Mr. Mill is in the same “camp” of open government advocates as Joshua Tauberer (above) and the two have collaborated on numerous projects. Other search engines created/recommended by Mr. Mill to try: federalregister.gov, govpulse.us and data.gov. Mr. Mill’s materials can be found starting on page 128 of the conference materials.

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

Congressional Information Symposium: Presented by AZALL

by Michelle Vallance 19. April 2013 15:28

Hope you'll join me in attending this seminar on Friday, April 26th, 2013!

To Register Visit: http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/azll/legal-research-institute.asp

Registration for students is only $50!

Contact Jennifer Mannino at jmannino@risc-llc.com for more information!

**Earn 5 hours CLE credit!**

 

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