Arizona Legal Research Guide

by Lidia Koelbel 20. June 2013 10:09

The Library would like to announce the publication of the Arizona Legal Research Guide.  This newest guide is a compilation of numerous helpful resources for different types of research on Arizona's laws, cases, regulations, and practice.  The guide includes free resources proven to be very useful in real practice when costly subscription databases are no longer readily available. 

There is also historical information and links to other compilations of resources expanding the materials available to you.  Take a look for yourself.  You can access the guide here:  http://researchguides.phoenixlaw.edu/ArizonaLegalResearch

Alison Ewing's expertise in Arizona legal research was crucial to the composition of this guide.

Social Media and the Law

by Sarah Prosory 28. January 2011 16:07

Things are stirring up when it involves social media and the law...

Check out this article regarding private Facebook posts being mined by defense lawyers. This seems to be a new litigation tactic. Hat tip to Slashdot.  

From reading the article above I discovered Westlaw News & Insight Beta. Looks like a promising place for legal news. Some of the articles have links to Westlaw for ease to view the cases.

And... it appears to have happened yet again, jurors doing their own research. Only this time a librarian juror was a bit too interested in doing her own research for a case. We've discussed this before how jurors are more often doing their own research about a case because it has become so easy for them to do so with their cell phones and Internet capabilities at home. Here's another article I found on this topic.

What do you think should be done? Comment below!

Juror Searches Wikipedia

by Sarah Prosory 17. December 2010 08:49

This morning I saw this Slashdot.org article about a mistrial declared in Florida because a juror searched Wikipedia for a term that was unknown to her. She was "just looking up a phrase". Despite numerous warnings from the judge to jurors to not research the case, the juror brought what she found on Wikipedia to the jury room.

This is nothing new. Back in January of 2010, a murder case was thrown out because a juror looked up a definition on Wikipedia as well. The Washington Post wrote a very good article about how technology has caused more trouble for jurors who need to refrain from using it while serving on a jury.

My pondering is... will jury rules need to change to adjust to our technology-filled world? Should lawyers provide definitions/more information to confused jurors, so that jurors don't need to feel that they should look things up themselves? All it takes is a Google search on a smartphone and they have their confusion resolved. Give your comments below!

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