Arizona Legal Research Guide

by Lidia Koelbel 20. June 2013 10:09

The Library would like to announce the publication of the Arizona Legal Research Guide.  This newest guide is a compilation of numerous helpful resources for different types of research on Arizona's laws, cases, regulations, and practice.  The guide includes free resources proven to be very useful in real practice when costly subscription databases are no longer readily available. 

There is also historical information and links to other compilations of resources expanding the materials available to you.  Take a look for yourself.  You can access the guide here:  http://researchguides.phoenixlaw.edu/ArizonaLegalResearch

Alison Ewing's expertise in Arizona legal research was crucial to the composition of this guide.

Congressional Information from the “Insiders” Point of View: Part 1

by Alison Ewing 15. May 2013 14:38

  

 

 

 

 

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that   featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: The Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History. Part 2 will feature GovTrack.us and Congressional bill tracking.

Ellen Sweet, Legislative Reference Specialist at the Tax Division, U.S. Department of Justice, led the audience through the legislative process using a federal Indian law (NAGPRA) that included detailed information about the documents produced from the process and which of those documents are the most likely to yield legislative intent information. Excellent flowcharts illustrated the process. Her materials can be found starting at page 37 of the conference materials.

The excellent, up-to-date Finding or Compiling Federal Legislative Histories Electronically was presented by Rick McKinney, the Assistant Law Librarian at the Federal Reserve Board Library. Mr. McKinney’s expertise is the electronic availability of legislative documents and the chart that he included in his materials is a timesaver for anyone who does legislative intent research.

Ms. Sweet and Mr. McKinney are co- authors of the indispensable Law Librarians’ Society of D.C. Legislative Sourcebook 

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

 

 

 

Proposed House Bill HB 2467

by Lidia Koelbel 26. January 2013 12:14

Constitutional?  Argue among yourselves.

See the proposed bill that will require high school students to take an oath to receive their diploma.  It is available at the Arizona State Legislature website.  Click the link below:

http://www.azleg.gov//FormatDocument.asp?inDoc=/legtext/51leg/1r/bills/hb2467p.htm&Session_ID=110 

The politicians introducing the bill are Representatives Thorpe, Borrelli, Seel, Shope, Smith: Dial, Livingston, Senator Crandell.

 

morguefile.com

Quick Reference Guide to PIPA, SOPA, and the OPEN Act

by Alison Ewing 18. January 2012 17:03

From the American Library Association (ALA)...

"Three copyright-related bills are currently in play at the start of 2012 – all of which take aim at any website beyond U.S. borders that distribute counterfeit or copyright infringing products. All three bills operate under the assumption that there is a problem that needs to be solved – and the best, or only, way to combat online infringement overseas is with more law targeted at foreign websites. These bills have the potential to negatively impact fundamental library principles. The following chart [link] is for quick reference (not meant to be comprehensive), and outlines the primary issues and concerns of interest to the library community and those who use the Internet."

~Corey Williams, American Library Association.

 

Hat tip to the Law Librarian Blog, and beSpacific

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