Arizona Legal Research Guide

by Lidia Koelbel 20. June 2013 10:09

The Library would like to announce the publication of the Arizona Legal Research Guide.  This newest guide is a compilation of numerous helpful resources for different types of research on Arizona's laws, cases, regulations, and practice.  The guide includes free resources proven to be very useful in real practice when costly subscription databases are no longer readily available. 

There is also historical information and links to other compilations of resources expanding the materials available to you.  Take a look for yourself.  You can access the guide here:  http://researchguides.phoenixlaw.edu/ArizonaLegalResearch

Alison Ewing's expertise in Arizona legal research was crucial to the composition of this guide.

Congressional Information from the Insider's Point of View: Part 2

by Michelle Vallance 3. June 2013 11:45

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: Congressional bill tracking with GovTrack.us and the Sunlight Foundation. Part 1 featured the Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History.

Joshua Tauberer, creator of Govtrack.us, engaged the audience with his provocative presentation titled Overview of Congressional Information Policy and the Internet.  Mr. Tauberer is an advocate of open government and particularly of open government data. His website Govtrack.us, a legislative reference and bill tracking site, is actually built upon data provided by the U.S. government in similar Congressional websites like FDsys and THOMAS. Govtrack.us has many advanced search capabilities in addition to some unique features like an automatic redlining feature when comparing bill versions and the ability to create a statistical probability chart of a particular bill getting passed in Congress. His presentation materials can be found starting at page 9 of the conference materials.

Eric Mill, who works on tech policy and software at the Sunlight Foundation, led a compelling presentation titled Tracking Government Information Online. One of many of Mr. Mill’s impressive software creations is the search engine and alert system for government information called Scout. Mr. Mill is in the same “camp” of open government advocates as Joshua Tauberer (above) and the two have collaborated on numerous projects. Other search engines created/recommended by Mr. Mill to try: federalregister.gov, govpulse.us and data.gov. Mr. Mill’s materials can be found starting on page 128 of the conference materials.

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

Congressional Information from the “Insiders” Point of View: Part 1

by Alison Ewing 15. May 2013 14:38

  

 

 

 

 

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that   featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: The Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History. Part 2 will feature GovTrack.us and Congressional bill tracking.

Ellen Sweet, Legislative Reference Specialist at the Tax Division, U.S. Department of Justice, led the audience through the legislative process using a federal Indian law (NAGPRA) that included detailed information about the documents produced from the process and which of those documents are the most likely to yield legislative intent information. Excellent flowcharts illustrated the process. Her materials can be found starting at page 37 of the conference materials.

The excellent, up-to-date Finding or Compiling Federal Legislative Histories Electronically was presented by Rick McKinney, the Assistant Law Librarian at the Federal Reserve Board Library. Mr. McKinney’s expertise is the electronic availability of legislative documents and the chart that he included in his materials is a timesaver for anyone who does legislative intent research.

Ms. Sweet and Mr. McKinney are co- authors of the indispensable Law Librarians’ Society of D.C. Legislative Sourcebook 

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

 

 

 

Congressional Information Symposium: Presented by AZALL

by Michelle Vallance 19. April 2013 15:28

Hope you'll join me in attending this seminar on Friday, April 26th, 2013!

To Register Visit: http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/azll/legal-research-institute.asp

Registration for students is only $50!

Contact Jennifer Mannino at jmannino@risc-llc.com for more information!

**Earn 5 hours CLE credit!**

 

Research from a Congressional Point of View

by Alison Ewing 13. March 2013 16:11

 Researching  a topic and want to know what congress has had to say about it? One of the best resources for congressional research is ProQuest Congressional .  Why would you use ProQuest Congressional instead of Westlaw and Lexis? Here are some examples.

Let’s say you are writing your paper on the Indian Court of Offenses and want to cite to the 1926 primary source hearings on that subject…it’s on ProQuest Congressional but not on WL or Lexis.  In fact, ProQuest Congressional has documents that go back to 1789! Maybe you are researching the recent Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 but want some historical perspective on the topic. ProQuest Congressional has hearings and congressional reports that pre-date the passage of the original Violence Against Women Act of 1990.  ProQuest also includes document types not found on WL or Lexis, like maps!  

ProQuest Congressional can be found in the drop-down menu on the Library’s website under Library Databases. 

It’s easy to see what you are searching when you go to the Advanced Search screen:

Questions? Ask a Librarian!

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