Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin: Comprehensive Research Guide

by Michelle Vallance 5. July 2013 16:46

If you were following the recent affirmative action case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, then you might be interested in a research guide compiled by the UT Law Library. http://tarltonguides.law.utexas.edu/fisher-ut

The guide provides full-text access to all of the pleadings in the case, from its original filing in the W.D. of Texas. In addition, you can find links to significant scholarly articles on affirmative action, as well as a news archive detailing the history of the Fisher case.

This is a terrific resource, especially if you are interested in writing your AWR on affirmative action!

AWR Need a Gentle Nudge?

by Yvette Brown 24. June 2013 17:33

 

Creative juices done gone bone dry!  Check out Writer's Block / Writer's Anxiety

AWR Research Blues getting you down, email your AWR Librarian Liaison for a research consultation.  If your hectic schedule is just too hectic to schedule an appointment don’t sweat it.  Just stop by the Legal Research Help Desk before or after classes.  

Got a burning AWR research question at midnight that just can’t wait?  The AWR Papers - Research and Resources guide is the go to place for research tips.

Wishing for a published AWR.  Well, click over to ssrn.com and see a Phoenix School of Law AWR -- Can Shame Be Therapeutic? .

Memory a tad bit foggy about grammar or punctuation rules?  Consult the index in Bryan Garner, The Redbook: A Manual on Legal Style.  Style manuals set the “standards” for writing.  The manuals answer questions about punctuation, word usage, capitalization, italics, underling, document design, plurals, possessives, and other writing conventions.  Multiple copies of The Redbook are available at the Circulation Desk.

Last but not least, if editing is not your forte use the Student Self-Editing Checklist for Law School Papers, Notes and Comments.

Good luck researching and writing!

Arizona Legal Research Guide

by Lidia Koelbel 20. June 2013 10:09

The Library would like to announce the publication of the Arizona Legal Research Guide.  This newest guide is a compilation of numerous helpful resources for different types of research on Arizona's laws, cases, regulations, and practice.  The guide includes free resources proven to be very useful in real practice when costly subscription databases are no longer readily available. 

There is also historical information and links to other compilations of resources expanding the materials available to you.  Take a look for yourself.  You can access the guide here:  http://researchguides.phoenixlaw.edu/ArizonaLegalResearch

Alison Ewing's expertise in Arizona legal research was crucial to the composition of this guide.

AWR & Study Aids Workshops This Week!

by Michelle Vallance 4. June 2013 12:15

            

Considering tackling your AWR soon? Join us on Wednesday, June 5th from 12-1pm in the Law Library's Teaching Lab, Classroom 1337, for a workshop titled Getting Started on Your AWR. This workshop will expose you to the pre-research process.  You will learn to identify research sources in order to narrow down topics and determine whether a chosen topic is practical - with enough accessible, available research.  This workshop will also include a discussion on setting personal research deadlines. Please feel free to bring your lunch!

Would you like to gain a better understanding of a legal topic you are studying this summer? Are you interested in finding out more about the Law Library's Academic Success collection and Westlaw's online study aids? Come learn some tips for success from your very own Law Library staff this Wednesday, June 5th from 3-4pm. The Study Aids workshop will take place in the Library's Teaching Lab, located on the 13th floor in Classroom 1337.

Take a look at our library workshops page to view a list of workshop descriptions and a link to the workshop calendar.

Congressional Information from the “Insiders” Point of View: Part 1

by Alison Ewing 15. May 2013 14:38

  

 

 

 

 

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that   featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: The Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History. Part 2 will feature GovTrack.us and Congressional bill tracking.

Ellen Sweet, Legislative Reference Specialist at the Tax Division, U.S. Department of Justice, led the audience through the legislative process using a federal Indian law (NAGPRA) that included detailed information about the documents produced from the process and which of those documents are the most likely to yield legislative intent information. Excellent flowcharts illustrated the process. Her materials can be found starting at page 37 of the conference materials.

The excellent, up-to-date Finding or Compiling Federal Legislative Histories Electronically was presented by Rick McKinney, the Assistant Law Librarian at the Federal Reserve Board Library. Mr. McKinney’s expertise is the electronic availability of legislative documents and the chart that he included in his materials is a timesaver for anyone who does legislative intent research.

Ms. Sweet and Mr. McKinney are co- authors of the indispensable Law Librarians’ Society of D.C. Legislative Sourcebook 

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

 

 

 

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