AWR & Study Aids Workshops This Week!

by Michelle Vallance 4. June 2013 12:15

            

Considering tackling your AWR soon? Join us on Wednesday, June 5th from 12-1pm in the Law Library's Teaching Lab, Classroom 1337, for a workshop titled Getting Started on Your AWR. This workshop will expose you to the pre-research process.  You will learn to identify research sources in order to narrow down topics and determine whether a chosen topic is practical - with enough accessible, available research.  This workshop will also include a discussion on setting personal research deadlines. Please feel free to bring your lunch!

Would you like to gain a better understanding of a legal topic you are studying this summer? Are you interested in finding out more about the Law Library's Academic Success collection and Westlaw's online study aids? Come learn some tips for success from your very own Law Library staff this Wednesday, June 5th from 3-4pm. The Study Aids workshop will take place in the Library's Teaching Lab, located on the 13th floor in Classroom 1337.

Take a look at our library workshops page to view a list of workshop descriptions and a link to the workshop calendar.

Congressional Information from the Insider's Point of View: Part 2

by Michelle Vallance 3. June 2013 11:45

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: Congressional bill tracking with GovTrack.us and the Sunlight Foundation. Part 1 featured the Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History.

Joshua Tauberer, creator of Govtrack.us, engaged the audience with his provocative presentation titled Overview of Congressional Information Policy and the Internet.  Mr. Tauberer is an advocate of open government and particularly of open government data. His website Govtrack.us, a legislative reference and bill tracking site, is actually built upon data provided by the U.S. government in similar Congressional websites like FDsys and THOMAS. Govtrack.us has many advanced search capabilities in addition to some unique features like an automatic redlining feature when comparing bill versions and the ability to create a statistical probability chart of a particular bill getting passed in Congress. His presentation materials can be found starting at page 9 of the conference materials.

Eric Mill, who works on tech policy and software at the Sunlight Foundation, led a compelling presentation titled Tracking Government Information Online. One of many of Mr. Mill’s impressive software creations is the search engine and alert system for government information called Scout. Mr. Mill is in the same “camp” of open government advocates as Joshua Tauberer (above) and the two have collaborated on numerous projects. Other search engines created/recommended by Mr. Mill to try: federalregister.gov, govpulse.us and data.gov. Mr. Mill’s materials can be found starting on page 128 of the conference materials.

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

New Graduate? Hanging a shingle? Need a low cost option for research support?

by Kristin Moye 30. May 2013 17:20

New Graduate? Hanging a shingle? Need a low cost option for research support? 

The Phoenix School of Law (PhoenixLaw) Library is pleased to continue to support the research needs of our alumni. After graduation, any graduate can register for an Alumni Access Membership at the Library. In order to use the Library as an alumnus, you must complete the registration form and submit it to the Circulation Department; obtain a new "alumni" identification card photo from the Library or Facilities department; and pay the annual registration fee of $50.00 (along with the one-time $30.00 access card fee). Your membership includes access to:

 
 - A Public Access Westlaw terminal in a study room
 - Print Sources like statutes, administrative regulations, court rules, case law, treatises
 - Arizona CLE Materials
 - Arizona Practice Series
 - Hein Online
 - BNA
 - LegalTrac
 - FastCase
 - Oxford Scholarship Online
 - ProQuest Research Library
 - Help from the librarians at the Legal Research Help Desk
 -
Library Workshops including those that may be CLE eligible

Join today!

Congressional Information from the “Insiders” Point of View: Part 1

by Alison Ewing 15. May 2013 14:38

  

 

 

 

 

The Arizona Association of Law Libraries recently presented a full day program on Congressional Information that   featured distinguished speakers from the Department of Justice, the Federal Reserve Board, the Sunlight Foundation, GovTrack.us as well as the Arizona State Library and the ASU Law Library.  This blog will cover two of the speaker presentations: The Federal Legislative Process and Finding and Compiling a Congressional Legislative History. Part 2 will feature GovTrack.us and Congressional bill tracking.

Ellen Sweet, Legislative Reference Specialist at the Tax Division, U.S. Department of Justice, led the audience through the legislative process using a federal Indian law (NAGPRA) that included detailed information about the documents produced from the process and which of those documents are the most likely to yield legislative intent information. Excellent flowcharts illustrated the process. Her materials can be found starting at page 37 of the conference materials.

The excellent, up-to-date Finding or Compiling Federal Legislative Histories Electronically was presented by Rick McKinney, the Assistant Law Librarian at the Federal Reserve Board Library. Mr. McKinney’s expertise is the electronic availability of legislative documents and the chart that he included in his materials is a timesaver for anyone who does legislative intent research.

Ms. Sweet and Mr. McKinney are co- authors of the indispensable Law Librarians’ Society of D.C. Legislative Sourcebook 

Need help with a legislative history project? Ask a Librarian!

 

 

 

Legal Consequences of 3D Printers Technology

by Lidia Koelbel 14. May 2013 14:34

The latest printing technology is here in the form of a 3D printer.  The law must keep up with technology advancing so quickly.

For an examination of issues involving 3D printers and copyright law see Edward Lee, Digital Originality, 14 Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law 919 (2012), http://ssrn.com/abstract=2128799.

See also the New York Times article on the legal issues that can potentially arise from the use of 3D printers.  Nick Bilton, Disruptions: The 3-D Printing Free-for-All, N.Y. Times, Nov. 13, 2011, http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/disruptions-the-3-d-printing-free-for-all/?smid=pl-share.

An additional issue involve the hot topic of gun control.  See the New York Times article on the University of Texas law student.  The ATF would like to keep an eye on individuals who print guns with 3D printers - if it could.  Nick Bilton, Disruptions: With a 3-D Printer, Building a Gun With the Push of a Button, N.Y. Times, Oct. 12, 2012, http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/07/with-a-3-d-printer-building-a-gun-at-home/?smid=pl-share.

One could run amok with the AWR possibilities in this topic or addressing part of it...

 

wordpress.com

non-3D gun morguefile.com

 

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